Posts Tagged ‘random venting’

Why is it hard to talk about fat pets?

November 14th, 2011

angry pet owner, pet owner denying pet's obesityIt’s not just me or Dr. Jed–it’s every vet I know. As soon as we mention that Fido is getting a little thick around the middle, our pet owners who seconds ago loved us now stare at us with hatred and resentment in their eyes!

Why is it so hard to talk to pet owners about keeping their pets a reasonable weight?

From dog to hog, from rabbit to cat,
Most pets I treat are relentlessly fat.

True, I have my clients that are happy to hear this and work towards their pet’s optimum weight, but they are in the minority.  Not sure if your pet is overweight? Ask a vet!

Today, as obesity in people is unanimously recognized as being dangerous for our heart, liver, kidney, joints, why isn’t obesity in pets given that same recognition, that same warning?

fat dog, chihuahua, obese chihuahua, obese dog

This Chihuahua needs more than a StairMaster

Barring medical causes of weight gain and decreased metabolism, pet obesity is something that pet owners actually have control over.  If I had someone determining when and how much I ate, I am sure I would be much more fit than I am.  Why don’t more pet owners realize this?  Food is not love!

I once had a 42 pound dachshund as a patient.  He was so sweet, and I loved his parents, but they wouldn’t do anything about his weight.  His belly dragged the ground.  When he died, he couldn’t even walk.  In the world were we have control over very little, this is something pet owners should take charge of!

If your vet tells you that Fido is overweight, it doesn’t mean you’re doing a bad job!  We usually have at least one pet on a diet.
Is there a better way to approach the topic?  Let us know! This vet needs your input as to what the best “weigh” to talk to pet owners about when Fido the pooch develops, well, more than a pooch.

Dr. Laci

SIGNATURE DVM

Dr. Laci Nash Schaible, DVM


Spay and Neuter Clinic Under Political Attack

July 23rd, 2011
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Click picture above to learn more.

While the phrase “spay and neuter your pets” is not new to anyone’s ears, there are still between 4-5 million animals that are euthanized each year across America. That number is down drastically from previous decades, when over 20 million dogs and cats were killed in U.S. Shelters. While countless people help spread this message, it really boils down to pet owners taking their pets to the vet to have the surgeries performed, and having the money to pay the bill.

While it shouldn’t be about politics, sometimes it is. Remind Alabama’s State Board it’s about the animals, and please take a moment to sign the petition and stay up to date HERE.

Low cost spay and neuter clinics have made a world of difference to our nation’s dog and cat overpopulation problem. Many vet hospitals charge an arm and a leg to spay and neuter a pet, and many of us rely on these clinics, especially in today’s economic condition. This is a good thing for people and the pets, right?

Surprisingly enough (and disappointingly) the Alabama State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners is actively trying to shut down local spay/neuter clinics. Their claim? The spay/neuter clinic is in violation of Alabama code because it isn’t owned by a veterinarian. Read the rest of this entry »

When a cat can’t urinate

January 19th, 2011

How well read are you?ask a vet, cat can't urinate, sick cat, online vet
Today I want to share a special story that happened this week to a colleague and best friend of mine. Sadly, it happens all too often in veterinary medicine.

This past Saturday, an elderly couple took their cat to the vet with the complaint of having trouble urinating. The vet did an analysis of the urine and saw a plethora of crystals and white blood cells. I don’t know if the owners were wearing ear plugs, had their hearing aids turned off, denied all treatment, or if the vet was really that lousy, but the people went home with nothing but antibiotics–which is insane treatment to another vet.

Come Tuesday morning, the concerned couple again called the vet. Their beloved cat was doing worse, had vomiting and diarrhea, still had trouble urinating, and just seemed like a very sick cat.  They were told to bring him back in–for more fees of course. They declined, as they were on a fixed budget.

At 4:30 pm, they showed up at the vet’s office. Granted, they did not have an appointment, so I understand this can be difficult to squeeze them in as a vet, BUT, ethically, you are the active and current doctor overseeing this case which does put an legally arguable responsibility on you to see the pet.

This vet should have been thinking, “oh my goodness, this cat is probably blocked and could be about to die. I need to make this cat my #1 priority!”

Read the rest of this entry »

Leak under the Kitchen Sink

December 3rd, 2010

By Jana Radeask a vet a question online, second vet opinion, is my dog sick, symptoms of a sick dog

You find a small puddle under your kitchen sink and because you’re quite sure you didn’t spill anything you call a plumber.

The plumber comes and examines it carefully. “It seems to be a minor leak, might stop on it’s own, why don’t you keep an eye on it for couple weeks and see what happens,” he says.

You pay the plumber and watch it for couple of weeks, wiping up puddles.

Drip. Drip. Drip.

It does not stop, it seems to be getting worse. You call the plumber again.

Why would you let your vet get away with something you wouldn’t tolerate from your plumber?  It’s your pet’s health that is in stake.

He takes a look at it and informs you that you indeed have a leaking pipe. “It’s an old building,” he says, “something like that is to be expected.”

Yes, you know that you’re living in an old building. But you don’t want to spend your days wiping up under your sink.

“Hm, why don’t you put a container underneath it, that should prevent damage from the leak. Call me in couple weeks if this doesn’t help.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Euthanasias Gone Wrong: Just Mistakes or an Indicator of a Nationwide Illness?

November 20th, 2010

target the hero dog euthanized accidentally by US shelter

Hero dog survives war but not U.S. shelter system

You  remember Mia’s story–the Rottweiler who survived euthanasia and was later adopted by another family who is financially capable of seeking medical treatment for her ailments? Happy ending to a shocking mistake, from a real lack-of-class-act veterinarian.

A mere month later, we mourn the loss of Target. Target was a true hero and saved the lives of American soldiers by preventing a suicide bomber access to a large room where soldiers were. She, along with a couple other stray dogs, had befriended the American soldiers serving in Afghanistan, and after their act of courage and loyalty proving to be man’s best friend, Target was brought over to the U.S. and adopted by Sergeant Terry Young, one of the soldiers Target helped save.

Target quickly earned a special place in the heart of Young’s family, as well as melted the hearts of many Americans after her appearance on Oprah. Her glory though, was short-lived.

Mass breeding only leads to mass murder. America is all too quick and eager to bring pets into this world, and all too quick to end their lives.

Target escaped from her owners last Friday. Her owners contacted local news channels to alert the public that she was missing. Friday night, Sgt. Young found Target’s picture on the local shelter’s website. He paid the fee via computer to adopt her, and mistakenly assumed the shelter was closed for the weekend.

Monday morning he went to rescue Target from the shelter, only to learn that she had been killed. Mistakenly. Read the rest of this entry »

Organic: Do you Know What it Really Means?

November 19th, 2010

organic seal, USDA organic seal, organic food, organic, USDAThey are everywhere. On your menu, on the shelves of wine stores, their own section at the supermarket, even their own supermarket. As I sit here drinking my organic milk—under the direct recommendation of someone whose family owns and operates a dairy farm–I wonder what information the public is receiving.

So what does the organic label mean? It means the food product has been made in accordance with the standards set by the National Organic Standards Board. For meat, these standards have to do with housing, feed, and health-care. Read the rest of this entry »

Why is it hard to talk about fat pets?

November 18th, 2010

angry pet owner, pet owner denying pet's obesityIt’s not just me or Dr. Jed–it’s every vet I know. As soon as we mention that Fido is getting a little thick around the middle, our pet owners who seconds ago loved us now stare at us with hatred and resentment in their eyes!

Why is it so hard to talk to pet owners about keeping their pets a reasonable weight?

From dog to hog, from rabbit to cat,
Most pets I treat are relentlessly fat.

True, I have my clients that are happy to hear this and work towards their pet’s optimum weight, but they are in the minority. Not sure if your pet is overweight? Ask a vet!

Today, as obesity in people is unanimously recognized as being dangerous for our heart, liver, kidney, joints, why isn’t obesity in pets given that same recognition, that same warning? Read more

How can you tell if a dog is a fighter or just got in a fight? It can be a dangerous undertaking for all involved. Part II

November 14th, 2010

Now back to inner city rescues and practices:

In an inner city practice or rescue, it is often hard to tell which pit bulls were attacked in a fighting ring and which were attacked by accident.  I mean, a lot of these fighters are not pros.  Many of them adopt these dogs and don’t pay thousands for pedigree fighters.  Others just “adopt” them or steal them off the streets or from families.  And it is only fair to report if you have absolutely enough evidence to do so.

Cute Pit Bull Terrier

Here are the signs I looked for:

The People:

  1. Tried to pay cash in the room and didn’t want a record of it
  2. Arrives with a large group of friends
  3. Asked for extra pain meds, antibiotics, vitamins, supply catalogs, extra bandages, ointment, etc.
  4. Catch them going through the drawers Read the rest of this entry »

How can you tell if a dog is a fighter or just got in a fight? It can be a dangerous undertaking for all involved. Part I of II

November 14th, 2010

Reporting dog fighting can be really confusing and dangerous for an inner city vet.  Here is an article about how I handled it in inner city Philadelphia.

Dog fighting is a felony in all fifty States and veterinarians are mandated reporters of animal cruelty in many States and provided immunity for good faith reporting in other states.  But these laws are constantly changing.  All I knew was that when I was practicing in center city Philadelphia, I was not practicing in a State where I was protected or immune from civil action if I reported in error.  Not to mention, I practiced in a very dangerous neighborhood at the time, and was often terrified to do the right thing- but I did anyway. It was complicated in practice and at the shelter where I volunteered occasionally.

Dog fight

Inner city pit bulls were the main dogs that presented as the biters or bitten.  They fought with other dogs because they were not trained to do so.  For two years I had fighting dogs popping out of my exam rooms and survived it with the help of a skilled staff, muzzles, and patience.  Of course pit bulls, if properly trained like any dogs, can be great family dogs.  They can be sweet, loyal, and fun.  It’s just that the majority of bite wounds and dog attacks I saw in the poor part of center city Philadelphia were untrained pit bulls.  It was a fact.

Most of the dogs I suspected to be fighters were pit bulls, Chow Chows, Boxers, and hybrids.

Uneducated poor pet owners that shouldn’t be pet owners owned the majority of the mean pit bulls I saw.   Believe it or not, it was not uncommon for there to be accidental dog fights fights in the parking lot.  There was even an attack in a car out front.

More to follow…

Dr. Jed

Dr. Jed Schaible Signature

Dr. Jed Schaible VMD





This post is part of the 2010 Blogathon Fund Raising Charity Initiative.

VetLIVE is trying to raise money for National Mill Dog Rescue. National Mill Dog Rescue (NMDR) has saved over 3828 dogs and counting. At National Mill Dog Rescue, “It’s all about the dogs.” NMDR has pledged to put an end to the cruelty and evil of the commercial breeding industry, more commonly known as puppy mills. Through educating the public and through the use of their 500 volunteers, NMDR is on the cutting edge of saving mill pets and helping improve the industry. NMDR is a 501c3 nonprofit organization.

Please simply press the “Donate” button below to contribute. All size donations are accepted!


Victory in Missouri! Online Vets Celebrate

November 5th, 2010

The Next Step in Ending Puppy Mills

24/7 vet advice | Champagne GlassesIt was not the landslide victory you and I think it should have been, but Missouri’s Proposition B did pass! Woo hoo! The victory is ours!

While it is wonderful and remarkably encouraging that this bill did indeed pass in the puppy mill capitol of the U.S., it was a narrow pass–barely over 51% overall pass, and more than 100 of the state’s 114 counties were against it. Thank God for urban living.

We have barely had time to recover for our champagne headaches in celebration for the bill’s pass, and already the haters are threatening, saying they are formulating plans to repeal the bill, or dilute it at best.

Who are these people?

Read the rest of this entry »